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Pregnant women/people to be offered the Covid-19 vaccine based on age and clinical risk group...



In the UK, JCVI has announced that pregnant women & people are to be offered the Covid-19 vaccine at same time as the rest of the population based on age and clinical risk group. This means pregnant individuals can decide whether to be vaccinated or not by weighing up the benefits and risks involved. Previously, the vaccine was only offered to pregnant people who were at high risk of Covid-19 complications such as those with an underlying condition or health and social care workers. There has been little research on the effect of the vaccines on pregnancy. Clinical trials of the mRNA vaccines Pfizer-BioNTech and Moderna that have included pregnant people have found no safety concerns so JCVI is advising it is preferable they are offered these where available[1].


Commenting on the move, Dr Edward Morris, President of the Royal College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists, said: “We are grateful to the JCVI for taking into consideration our evidence and updating the guidance around the COVID-19 vaccine in pregnancy. “Vaccination offers pregnant women the best protection from COVID-19, which can be serious in some women. We know pregnant women can get unwell with COVID-19; one in five pregnant women who become unwell and are admitted to hospital will have a premature birth. “We believe it should be a woman’s choice whether to have the vaccine or not after considering the benefits and risks and would encourage pregnant women to discuss with a trusted source like their GP, obstetrician or midwife, or a healthcare professional in a vaccination centre”[2].


Meanwhile in Ireland, the Faculty of Pathology and Institute of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists released a statement confirming 6 cases of stillbirth and one case of 2nd trimester miscarriage as a result of SARS-CoV2 placentitis between January and April 2020. SARS-CoV2 placentitis is a rare infection of the placenta which occurs in some pregnant women/people who have tested positive for Covid-19[3].


You can read more about the HSE Immunisation Guidelines including a section on COVID-19 vaccines and pregnant women here [4] https://www.hse.ie/eng/health/immunisation/hcpinfo/guidelines/covid19.pdf. If you are in the UK you can find more information for pregnant women/people from the RCOG here [5] https://www.rcog.org.uk/covid-vaccine


© PCOS Vitality 2021 NOT MEDICAL ADVICE. ALWAYS CONSULT YOUR DOCTOR.NOTE THAT THE SITUATION IS CONSTANTLY EVOLVING AS WE LEARN MORE ABOUT THE VACCINES & COVID SO TRY TO READ THE LATEST INFORMATION & DISCUSS WITH YOUR HCP.


References


[1] JCVI issues new advice on COVID-19 vaccination for pregnant women - GOV.UK, (n.d.). https://www.gov.uk/government/news/jcvi-issues-new-advice-on-covid-19-vaccination-for-pregnant-women (accessed April 16, 2021).

[2] Vaccine choice for pregnant women welcomed by maternity Royal Colleges, (n.d.). https://www.rcog.org.uk/en/news/vaccine-choice-pregnant-women-welcomed-maternity-royal-colleges/ (accessed April 16, 2021).

[3] RCPI » Covid Placentitis: Statement from the RCPI Faculty of Pathology and the Institute of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists, (n.d.). https://www.rcpi.ie/news/releases/covid-placentitis-statement-from-the-rcpi-faculty-of-pathology-and-the-institute-of-obstetricians-and-gynaecologists/ (accessed April 18, 2021).

[4] (No Title), (n.d.). https://www.hse.ie/eng/health/immunisation/hcpinfo/guidelines/covid19.pdf (accessed April 18, 2021).

[5] COVID-19 vaccines and pregnancy, (n.d.). https://www.rcog.org.uk/covid-vaccine (accessed April 18, 2021).

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